The poem that took the place of a mountain

The Poem That Took The Place Of A Mountain: Reflections On The Language of Place On April 13 we once again join with our friends at Caught By The River to present The Poem That Took The Place Of A Mountain: Reflections On The Language of Place. Richard King, author of the acclaimed How Soon is Now (2012) which was named Sunday Times Music Book of the Year, joins us to read from his new book Original Rockers (April 2nd). Philip Hoare has said of it: ‘A telling evocation of a lost past, so recent as to still be echoing …

Oxford Literary Festival: Nature and Language

I’m going to be discussing nature, language, ecology and wonder with George Monbiot, Caspar Henderson, Cameron Hepburn and Kathy Willis at the Oxford Literary Festival on the 22nd of March. Raymond Williams famously observed that ‘nature’ is perhaps the most complex word in the English language. If the word itself is complex, so too is the way that we talk about nature.  From the language we use to how we frame our relationship with nature, the way we talk about the natural world profoundly affects our perception of it and the related choices we make. It influences relationships with the …

Monki Gras 2014

Here’s a video of my talk at this year’s Monki Gras. The event is billed as a conference for software developers but it goes way beyond the boundaries of this description and presents a kind of inter-disciplinary, cross-craft-culture, idea jamboree to it’s attendees, who, from what I could tell, are a remarkable bunch of tech experts with catholic interests and omnivorous curiosities. I was very honored and more than a little nervous but luckily the audience were in an amenable mood, perhaps as a result of delicious Bibimbap for lunch and an inspiring and enchanting talk from The Gentle Author …