Post truths

The pets that were lost have either been found or mourned by now; the bake-sales and yard-sales have cashed up long ago; the evening classes and gigs have faded into the night leaving minds and ears abuzz. The flyers are gone but the staples remain, punctuating the telephone poles like empty quote marks – jumbles of silenced declarations, each a little monument to something wanted or something offered. The poles in this Montreal neighbourhood have been armoured by years of wanting and offering. The newer ones glint like chain-mail, the ancient ones are stained with rust and tar, they reward …

Uncommon Ground promo

Uncommon Ground Promo from Dominick Tyler on Vimeo. I shot some video whilst I was photographing for the book and I’ve put together a couple of short promos with the footage. Here’s the first. The beautiful music is by Sam Hooper.

Gaping Gill

For those who don’t suffer from claustrophobia, there are several routes into Gaping Gill, one of the largest and most spectacular underground chambers in Britain. The Southern slopes of Ingleborough in North Yorkshire are punctured here and there by holes big enough and deep enough to be given a wide berth by walkers and gleefully investigated by potholers. These are the entrances to a massive network of underground caves and passages, dissolved out of the limestone by the relentless flow of water. Dissapointment Pot, Bar Pot, Corkey’s Pot and Stream Passage Pot, among others, have all been linked by underground explorers …

Yorkshire Dales – windy day

I was up in Cumbria last week, shooting some work for the ‘Lakes and Dales’ section of the book and gathering more words for the glossary. I shot this film around Baugh Fell whilst looking for shake holes, gills and becks. The clouds were constantly chasing over the landscape in a way that just can’t be captured in stills. I also got to go down Gaping Gill and I shot a bit of film there too, which I’ll edit and upload soon.

Field Trip: Scotland, part 2

After four days in the mountains I set off for the Western Isles, in search of peat and sand and sea. The road from Fort William to the Kyle of Lochalsh cuts inland towards Spean Bridge before turning North across the valley and offering a view back towards the Nevis Range, which looked gentle and slight beneath a huge, heavy, roiling sky. For some pictures I stopped, but for many I didn’t and wished I had. Passing a football field in Invergarry, I saw a man riding a mobility scooter, armed with a shovel and tilting at molehills. He would …

Field trip: Scotland, part 1

With crampons strapped to my boots and an ice-axe in my hand I should have felt more like a mountaineer than an invalid, but on hands and knees, legs burning and shaky, hauling myself slowly up a steep, snow-covered slope and stopping frequently to catch my breath, I could hear the viscerally persuasive message my body was delivering: I still hadn’t recovered. My original plan was to make the journey to Scotland in February, part of a carefully organized schedule that slotted field trips amongst school holidays, and home and work commitments, but then the van’s gearbox broke beyond repair …

Northwards ho!

At the end of this week I’ll be driving up to Scotland for a fortnight of photography and research, so right now I’m packing and looking at maps and making sure all my gear is working. This trip was due to happen last month but first the van’s gearbox went and then I got a nasty bout of ‘flu, which then turned into a chest infection and all in all I had a fairly miserable February. The van is back on the road, thanks to Bernd Jäger, who supplied a reconditioned gearbox from his workshop in Liebnau, Germany, and especially …

Field Trip: Cornwall, part 2

After the rising tide halted my zawn hunting at Land’s End I drove along the south coast to the little village of Treen to photograph the Logan Rock. Logans are boulders that wobble (but they don’t fall down) they are formed when horizontal faults in stone outcrops are eroded to leave just one or two points of contact between separate masses. Sometimes huge rocks are balanced so finely that the slightest nudge can set them moving. This was once the case with the Treen Logan, an 80 ton block of granite perched on a cliff just south of the village, …

Field Trip: Cornwall, part 1

Driving from Dartmoor to Cornwall took me through familiar territory. I drove through the towns and villages where school friends lived, past my old secondary school in Callington and then, on impulse, I turned off to follow the winding back-roads route that my school bus took. Through Golberdon, South Hill and Linkinhorne the houses looked the same but different, maybe painted a new colour, maybe recently double-glazed. At South Hill I remembered the morning old Mr Deeble drove our bus, quite slowly, almost carefully, into a wall. We all disembarked to look at the damage while he sat motionless in …